How to achieve successful CMMS Implementation

Want to hear a frightening statistic? According to most online reports, approximately 80% of all computerised maintenance management system (CMMS) implementations fail.

What are the reasons for CMMS implementation failure?

ensure you don't have a poor implementation strategy

We believe it can be attributed to four main aspects:

  1. poorly defined goals
  2. lack of leadership buy-in,
  3. deficient training, and
  4. a non-intuitive user experience.

For more than 15 years MCGlobal Solutions has worked with customers on successful CMMS implementations. We address these challenges and focus our resources on ensuring customer success.

As a result, we’ve orchestrated hundreds of successful CMMS implementations—from large enterprises to smaller shops—and achieved a remarkably high overall customer satisfaction and project success rating.

So, what does a successful CMMS implementation look like?

And precisely how can your organisation ensure all the foundations are in place to achieve success?

Based on our experiences, we have defined ways to improve your team’s CMMS onboarding and implementation.

Three tips for a successful implementation

asset management business technology

1. Partner with experienced, strategic maintenance consultants.

MCGlobal Solutions encourages the inclusion of high-level staff to help drive the defined outcomes, and the project managers must understand how the project aligns with the company’s business strategy.

As CMMS consultants, MCGlobal Solution will:

  • Help you to establish an implementation plan and timeline which is required for implementation success.
  • Work with your management team to evaluate current business processes
  • Suggest improvements, if necessary
  • Predict the impact of adopting a CMMS solution, and
  • Determine how the software best fits into the mix.

As part of our implementation, we will work with business leaders to align your CMMS goals and advantages with existing operations. This will ensure adopting a CMMS will lead to improvements in efficiency, productivity and performance.

2. Commit to comprehensive and continual training.

There is nothing like upfront training and ongoing guidance to ensure your team becomes au fait with the full functionality of CMMS software. It also paves the way for better user adoption.

Ensure your CMMS’s upfront training is designed to educate employees on the benefits and uses of a CMMS; this should be across all departments. Involve your core maintenance team, along with key techs and vendors, by offering them the opportunity to get involved in comprehensive training resources.

Importantly, provide your teams with access to continued learning beyond the initial CMMS implementation.

This is imperative as:

  • new employees join your company,
  • system updates roll out, and
  • your company will grow.

3. Choose a dedicated success team.

Don’t just think about the software.

CMMS technology can track and improve maintenance performance, however it isn’t always easy to implement. Investing in a company-wide CMMS initiative requires commitment, including a team dedicated to its successful execution and adoption.

It is necessary to go beyond software capabilities when evaluating CMMS software options.

Benefits of dedicating a team to the project:

Successful onboarding

Using data migration, we will help coordinate a smooth database transformation to ensure all assets and preventive maintenance systems (PMs) are configured and accurate. This can save your team the stress and confusion of importing pertinent data.

Excellent lines of communication

Between implementation and adoption, communication is critical. A common error in CMMS implementation is a lack of support between the maintenance team and the vendor, having a dedicated team helps overcome this.

Greater business impact

If planned, developed and managed correctly, a CMMS will bring about greater efficiencies in organisational operations. Define project goals, roles and milestones to make better decisions about maintenance operations.

 

Why our Customers win with successful CMMS implementations

MCGlobal Solutions helps our customers solve real business problems, and ultimately, we work to make your day-to-day operations and tasks as efficient as possible. The team are committed to building software solutions that solve your business challenges, and we work hand-in-hand with you to make it happen.

 

What the MCGlobal Solutions team provides:

  • A highly experienced team who have consulted on many CMMS implementation projects across diverse industries
  • Set-up of all assets, PMs and inventories are successfully loaded, configured and accurate
  •  Training tailored to your user’s role and responsibilities. This will allow your staff to quickly adapt to the features and capabilities of the CMMS systems.
  • Focus on customer-attuned feature development and any third-party integrations with your other software systems are proposed.

Speak with our team for further advice on what CMMS software we can offer and how to achieve a successful CMMS implementation – CONTACT US

 

 

Remove the pain points of Maintenance Work Requests

Remove the Pain Points of Maintenance Work Requests

One of the best and worst things about being a Maintenance Manager is being so ‘popular’. Everyone wants a piece of you and, as you know, everything is urgent- at least to their way of thinking. When was the last time someone called you and said “No hurry on that work order request, take as long as you like.”

Of course, what might seem ‘red hot urgent’ to the person with the problem, may not be quite as urgent in the scheme of things as they might think.

Everyone has their own agenda and being the person in charge of maintenance issues, you play a key role in managing expectations.

Pain points associated with Work Order requests:

  1. Time lost in searching for unrelated information, and sifting through mountains of paperwork
  2. A loss of momentum, as one job comes straight over the top of another, and
  3. The feeling of being totally overwhelmed by the volume of work requests.

With this in mind, MCGlobal Solutions can provide proven ways to take the chaos out of maintenance work order requests.

Managing Maintenance Work Requests in 3 Steps:

Operations Management and Asset Maintenance

1) Conduct an Asset Criticality Assessment

Of the 200 or so work order requests that could be on your radar, not all of them will be critical.

The first thing to do is conduct a Criticality Assessment of the assets, prioritising all work requests.

Only those items requiring Statutory Compliance and/or impacting health and safety– such as checking for Legionella in a commercial HVAC system – are truly critical.

If it impacts a client experience, for example, a tap dripping at night in a hotel guest’s room or air conditioning not working in a shopping centre, its criticality is slightly lower.

The main advantage of a criticality assessment:

  1. It uses an established filter
  2. With predetermined criteria

It saves you from having to agonise over what risk level a task falls under by having criteria set. And it prevents you from going through the same process a few weeks later with a similar project.

If it ticks the box as critical, based on the predetermined criteria, then it automatically gets priority.

This will reduce the daily influx of work orders that must be dealt with immediately down to a more manageable figure.

2) Determine available resources

Once you have ascertained the criticality of work orders in descending order from “must do” to “wish list”, it is then a case of working out if you have the right resources on hand to confidently and competently do the work.

As you know, these resources are often interdependent.

For example, having the LABOUR to complete the task, in terms of supervisory staff and trades staff.

If the workforce is available, do you have the parts to complete the work?

If certain PART are not on hand, what is the timing for supply so the work order can be re-scheduled?

Also, you must consider the TOOLS and EQUIPMENT required for the task. You might have access to labour and parts, but if your team is on a mining site a piece of equipment might be 100kms away.

3) Consider physical access

This is where you need to look at the big picture, such as:

  • Is it safe?
  • Is it in use?
  • Is there other work going on that would prevent getting access? (Eg you need to paint, but earthworks are making the site too dusty)
  • Do other jobs require the same resources?
  • Can we schedule around regular maintenance?

This process can be stressful unless you have the right Computerised Maintenance Management System (CMMS) in place, one that will consider each and every facet of the job and give you a red or green light.

Our tailored CMMS will make short work of your work orders.

MCGlobal Solutions can configure the CMMS guaranteed to meet your specific industry challenges.

The system will be set up to effectively track, analyse and manage every component of your maintenance management operation, and;

  • give you an instant update on your real-time inventory,
  • increase efficiencies across the entire asset lifecycle
  • assist with better work scheduling,
  • improve the safety and reliability of your assets,
  • and much more.

Want professional advice about how to streamline work order requests?

Contact MCGlobal Solutions for more work order best practice information and professional advice tailored to your industry – Book a Demonstration

Synergy-Partner-Awards- MCGlobal Solution Most Innovative Partner Award

MCGlobal Solution receives Accruent Most Innovative Partner Award

Why is it Beneficial to Implement an Enterprise Asset Management Plan for your Maintenance Teams + What to Consider When Formulating the Framework

An Enterprise Asset Management Plan should be implemented regardless of how “aged” your assets are.  The Enterprise Asset Management Plan sets out what your desired level of service will be and provides this service level in the most cost-effective way.

The 5 major benefits of an Asset Management Plan

  1. Prolonging the asset life through efficient and focused operation and maintenance
  2. Meeting customer demands and expectations
  3. Budgeting and efficient use of resources
  4. Meeting service expectations
  5. Complying with regulatory requirements

What to consider in your Asset Management Plan

1. What is your current situation?

An extremely important first step to building the framework for your Enterprise Asset Management (EAM) Plan is understanding our assets.

  • What assets do we own? (Do you have an asset register?)
  • Where are the assets located?
  • What condition is each asset in?
  • What is its useful life?
  • What is the value of each asset?

2. What is the required level of service?

  • What level of service do the stakeholders demand? (Is it ok for the asset to be “down” for a period of time or is the item a “critical” asset)
  • Are there regulatory requirements?
  • What is the current actual level of performance? (Not what we think the performance level is, what it actually is)
  • What is the asset capable of? (Is it running at optimal speed/performance or has it been slowed down to save it?)

3. What are my critical assets?

  • How can the asset fail?
  • How do the assets fail?
  • What are the likelihood and the consequences of the asset failing?
  • What does it cost to repair the asset?

4. What are my life cycle costs?

  • What strategies are suitable for my organisation? (Predictive, Preventative, Run-To-Fail)
  • What would the costs be to maintain, repair, refurbish or replace the asset over the expected life of the asset?

An Enterprise Asset Management Plan is not a static document. Once you have formulated your framework, the components must be reviewed as situations change over time, or new best practices are established.

Interested in unlocking the full potential of your EAM?

Let us demonstrate what we can do for you, as it is never too late to formulate a quality Enterprise Asset Management Plan. Book a Demonstration.


Enterprise Asset Management Series

Next in our Enterprise Asset Management (EAM) series, we discuss some common issues in the industry and some best practices to get your EAM/CMMS running up to speed – The System Health Check

 

 

How to Define What Asset Maintenance and Management Regime to Employ.

Effective Decision-Making Process for Asset Management to Determine which Maintenance Plan to Adopt

In our previous blog, we covered the topic of ageing assets and their impact on facility management. Having determined an asset doesn’t necessarily need to be old to be “ageing”, all organisations need to look at a process to manage their assets regardless of the physical age of the equipment or facility.

Deciding how to maintain fixed assets or facilities

Regardless of the age or complexity of the facility, or the equipment, we need to make decisions as to how we are going to maintain (or not maintain) our assets.

The decisions made need to be what is best for our organisation and our processes. There is no “right or wrong” decision, however, there does need to be some sound reasoning behind the decisions we make. “Just because…” or “that’s the way they do it” is not sound reasoning.

As all assets age and deteriorate, wear or become obsolete, our decision-making process needs to look at a number of issues.

Determining an asset maintenance plan

A key issue we need to consider when determining the maintenance plan and how we are going to manage an asset, is what is the consequence of failure. Here are two examples:

1. High-risk asset management

If the asset we are considering is the drain valve at the base of a 100,000-litre tank containing sulphuric acid, the consequence of failure is extremely high. Not only would the business risk the financial loss of the value of 100,000 litres of acid, but it would also pose a high risk to the safety of staff, and neighbouring businesses as well as the potential environmental impact.

In the case of a high-risk asset, decision-making with regard to managing the asset will need to look at planning:

  1. rigorous testing
  2. inspections and
  3. monitoring so repair or replacement prior to any sign of wear and long before failure.

2. The low-risk asset management, and Run to Failure (RTF) method

On the other hand, if we are looking at the lighting in the admin office, what maintenance and asset management regime should be employed?

Again, our decision needs to consider what is the consequence of failure.

Should one of the fluorescent tubes fail, what would happen? As there are many light fittings in the office, the loss of one tube would have little to no effect on the operation of the business, there would be little safety impact and production would not be affected in any way.

When the fluorescent tube does fail, it is an easy job for the electrician to replace the tube and if there are no spare tubes on hand in the spare parts stockroom or service van, they are easily and quickly sourced from their supplier. Therefore, when we are making decisions regarding how we handle the ageing light fittings, we may decide that “Run to Failure” (RTF) is the appropriate method of managing the asset.

RTF means the assets maintenance strategy is that the assets are used until they break down, and require repair or replacement.

As shown by the example of the drain valve and the light fitting, there is no one solution that will suit all assets. RTF may in fact be the chosen management method but the decision process used to make this choice must be sound.

Adopt a rigorous & robust decision-making process

Regardless of what the asset is, there needs to be a rigorous and robust decision-making process in place to effectively and efficiently manage all assets as they age.

Contact MCGlobal Solutions for a review

MCGlobal Solutions are highly experienced to demonstrate how you can improve your asset and maintenance management decision-making process. Contact us to arrange a free consultation with our team to discuss a review your asset management and maintenance plan best practices.


Enterprise Asset Management Series

Next in our series, we discuss Why is it Beneficial to Implement an Enterprise Asset Management Plan for your Maintenance Teams + What to Consider When Formulating the Framework.

 

 

What are Ageing Assets, and What is the Impact on Facility Management as Asset Deterioration and Obsolescence Occurs

What are Ageing Assets + What is the Impact on Facility Management as Asset Deterioration and Obsolescence Occurs

If a colleague makes the comment to you, “we’re working in an ageing facility full of ageing assets”, what do you immediately think?

If you’re like most of us, you’ll probably picture a facility built in the 1920s with run-down equipment and buildings almost collapsing under their own weight.

In some cases, you’d be right, however, the issue of ‘ageing assets’ also applies to those managing brand-new,  state-of-the-art facilities. “How can that be?” I hear you ask…

Defining the term ‘ageing asset’

The term ‘ageing assets’ can be misleading. The term does not necessarily mean the equipment or the facility is old in years.

Ageing is taking into account how old an asset is, its condition, and how the condition is changing over time.

Ageing is the effect whereby a component suffers some form of deterioration and/or damage (usually, but not necessarily, associated with time in service) with an increased likelihood of failure.

The impact of asset deterioration and obsolescence

Just because an item of equipment is old does not necessarily mean it’s significantly deteriorated and damaged. There are many examples of old equipment and facilities still remaining fit for purpose, yet newer equipment showing accelerated deterioration or obsolescence.

The significance of the deterioration and/or damage relates to the potential effect on the equipment’s functionality, availability, reliability and safety.

Every facility or piece of equipment can begin ageing even before it’s commissioned. Newly commissioned facilities may have control systems and software that become obsolete, superseded, or require updates even before the plant is commissioned. Equipment poorly transported or stored prior to installation may have deteriorated or lost performance even before its first use.

Generally, the more hi-tech the equipment or facility is, the quicker obsolescence becomes an issue requiring management.

For example, how many times have you bought an electronic device such as a PC, laptop or television, only to find that before you have unboxed it, there is a better, faster, shinier model already released? …your brand-new device is no longer the current model.

All assets are required to be managed correctly to remain fit-for-purpose and to manage their obsolescence.

Book a free MCGlobal Solutions consultation

Contact us to arrange a consultation with our highly-experienced team to discuss a review your asset management and maintenance plan.

 


Enterprise Asset Management Series

Next in the series, we will discuss the decision-making process of maintaining assets and facilities.

MC Global Solutions Asset Management and Maintenance Software Solutions

Best Practices to Establishing System Naming Conventions

“A little forethought at the start can save a lot of time in the future.”

It is advised as a best practice to build a strong naming convention and protocols during the initial setup of the Computerised Maintenance Management System (CMMS). This will make it easier for workers to get used to using the Maintenance Connection modules. By employing a consistent and logical format, the explorer lists will naturally group listings to simplify the look-up and search process.

There are five modules where this is particularly relevant

  1. Assets
  2. Inventory
  3. Classifications
  4. Procedures
  5. Preventative Maintenance

1. Assets

As assets are often added, modified or moved within the asset tree, the ID and name need to contain sufficient information to make them identifiable without requiring them to be altered if modified or moved. The ID can often incorporate the classification or unique numbering associated with that asset. The name should start with a general description followed by increasing levels of refinement.

Asset ID and name example

Asset ID: GENDSL200-026

Asset Name:  Generator, Diesel Standby 200KVA Siemens

Always make allowances in the ID for future additions and larger sizes. In the given example, -026 was used in preference to -26 as there is the possibility that there may be more than 99 Generators in the future.

2. Inventory

Inventory/stock items can number into the thousands for many companies.

The ID and naming of these need to be standardised to allow

  • efficient searching for a part,
  • removal of duplication from non-standard descriptions,
  • sufficient descriptors to avoid ambiguity, and
  • new items to be added that match the existing naming convention.

Often the inventory ID is not related to the description of the item, but rather a simple indexed number matching a barcode. A defined number of numerals/letters is valuable in keeping inventory in order.

Inventory ID example

Inventory ID: FIX1003456

Inventory Name:  Bolt, M16 x 100 SST

Inventory ID: MTR040403F

Inventory Name:  Motor, 4KW 4Pole 3PH 415V Foot Mount

The name, however, should follow a noun-adjective protocol. It can also include manufacturer or model details in situations where this is relevant to the correct selection.

3. Classifications

In several major industries, some standards can help in creating a set of classifications. Reporting and analysis can be enhanced by having major classification groups, these can then be broken down further into more specific descriptions.

In the International Standard for the Petroleum, Petrochemical and Gas industry ISO 14224, they used a four-letter abbreviation to group and sort classifications

Classification naming convention example

COAX = Compressor (CO) – Axial (AX)

VESE = Vessel (VE) – Separator (SE)

A similar convention can be used by incorporating the same or more letters or numbers for other industries which do not have existing standards.

4. Procedures

Avoid creating duplicate procedures and easily identify all applicable procedures when updates are required by using the classifications in the procedure and preventative maintenance ID.

As the procedure can either relate to a time or meter-based interval, or an unscheduled type of repair, the ID and name need to be flexible enough to allow for all variables.

Procedure naming convention example

VESE-M48-M-30  = Vessel, Separator 48-Monthly Mechanical Internal & External Inspection

VESE-X01-M-01 = Vessel, Separator Recoating of Corrosion Protection

5. Preventative Maintenance

The classification can be incorporated into the preventative maintenance ID and the name. A similar protocol can be used, with the main variation being the inclusion of the asset within preventative maintenance.

Preventative maintenance ID example

PM-VESE-M-COMPSTN-01 = Vessel, Separator Mechanical Service Compression Station 01

Contact us for a free demonstration

For more information and advice about Maintenance Connection CMMS, please contact our friendly and highly-experienced team at MCGlobal Solutions. We can arrange a free demonstration of our asset management software based on your specific issues.

 

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Facility Managers 3 Step Guide to Maintenance Scheduling

As businesses grow the scheduled maintenance process becomes more complex, and it is exponentially harder to:

  1. achieve maximum productivity;
  2. contain operational and maintenance costs;
  3. have clear, concise reporting of maintenance activities.

Our guide to maintenance scheduling will demonstrate how Enterprise Asset Management (EAM) software streamlines workflows and keeps facility managers in complete control.

With an ever-growing list of scheduled maintenance tasks to perform, and a growing number of reactive maintenance jobs coming in, it becomes increasingly difficult to keep all the balls in the air, and plates confidently spinning.

Even experienced facility managers sometimes struggle to prioritise problems that invariably arise, such as maintenance schedules, labour resources and use of equipment. Ask yourself:

  • Have I got the inventory to complete the job?
  • Will issues have a flow-on effect through the organisation?
  • Does this satisfy statutory compliance?

With this in mind, here are the three basic steps to scheduling a job to make your working life so much easier. Plus, it will help you get the best return on investment (ROI) from your assets.

3 step guide to maintenance scheduling for facility managers

Step 1: Step back and look at the big picture

Criticality assessment

Before you schedule a maintenance job, enterprise asset management best practice strongly recommends you conduct a thorough criticality assessment. If you do not perform a criticality assessment to identify your most critical assets, you will base your decisions on perception rather than risk. This may result in wasted time and money.

For example, if a production line stops, due to something relatively small that could have been avoided, then the downstream impacts of production, deadlines and deliverables can become significant.

The key is to look further than the actual equipment itself, and determine what is depending on this equipment.

Establish priorities

All businesses have their own terminology/criteria to rank priorities; some use a colour system (such as red, amber and green), and others a 0-10 numerical system (with a ranking of “10” deemed to be highly critical).

Basically, it comes down to this:

  • Is it critical
  • Urgent
  • Normal
  • Low

In a perfect world, everything would be low-to-normal, but unless you’re super-efficient (or very lucky) this is rarely the case.

Once you have conducted your criticality assessment, and determined priorities, it is then a matter of working out how to track all of these issues so you can handle work requests with confidence.

Rather than struggle with spreadsheets (or sticky notes), a proven asset management system will keep you up to speed with every stage of every job.

MCGlobal Solution’s CEO, Steve Martin says:

“If this type of activity isn’t systemised, then the risk to the business is very high. Information in people’s heads can so easily be lost.”

When setting priorities to make sure non-urgent, yet time-sensitive maintenance work is not pushed to the back. For example, if the air conditioning is due to be serviced within a fixed period, failure to do so will infringe on Code compliance. Therefore, this will need to be slotted into the priorities list in a timely manner.

Having automatic alerts in your asset management system is a valued resource. It means any important, time-sensitive maintenance tasks won’t be overlooked.

3 step guide to maintenance scheduling for facility managers

Step 2: Assign your procedures

After looking at the maintenance work to be done and determining its criticality, your next step is to assign your procedures list.

In this step, you assign who does what – with unambiguous information about how it needs to proceed, when it needs to be done and who to pass the ball to once each process is carried out.

When assigning procedures attach documents

  • Standing Operating Procedures (SOP)
  • Safety instructions
  • Photos (if necessary/available)
  • and anything else that may relate to the job.

This documentation is particularly important because it ensures everyone is on the same page and all procedures are covered off. For example, if there are safety factors to consider such as if and when the power needs to be turned off (and back on again) during a maintenance job.

A procedures list provides valuable intel, such as

  • determining if there are any site induction requirements;
  • ensuring the correct parts are being ordered;
  • deciding if risk assessments need to be undertaken;
  • and so forth.

Ideally, to avoid double handling, this would all be carried out on a ‘click and done’ basis, with EAM software that seamlessly integrates with your operations. With the right facility asset management system in place, you’ll know instantly when things should happen.

Avoid potential problems

  • Stakeholders must be totally clear on “what’s next”.
  • The right people must have access to information as they need it.
  • Approvals/checkpoints must take place before the next step is taken.

3 step guide to maintenance scheduling for facility managers
Step 3: Implementation

Provided you’ve followed the first two steps involved in scheduling a maintenance job, this final step should be simple to implement, especially if you have an Enterprise Asset Management (EAM) system to coordinate everything.

It involves checking job calendars to see what other work is happening concurrently; depending on the workload, this may dictate the assignment date and/or the labour chosen to complete the task.

With an EAM system in place, it will immediately show you which people with the right skills are available. Furthermore, it will then automatically send out notifications to:

  • The people doing the job
  • The job requester
  • Other stakeholders

Enterprise Asset Management System

Sectors from healthcare to hospitality, and from manufacturing to retail, that follow these three steps will be improving operating efficiencies.

A proven enterprise asset management system will show who is doing what work orders now, and what is scheduled in the coming months.

You’ll have a total asset register, a failsafe inventory system, access to accurate recordings, and enjoy measurable results from an EAM software system with the utmost functionality.

For more information about enterprise asset management systems, or advice on specific problems and challenges you are facing, please call MC Global on (07) 3303 0177 or click here to contact us.